Skip navigation

Monthly Archives: April 2011

I wanted to post custom comments to my Facebook page using Facebook’s dialog. You need the Page’s UID to be able to post to it, and there’s no way in the Open Graph protocol to get the ID of a given URL. Here’s how you do it using the Javascript SDK and FQL:

function facebookGetIdForUrl(url, callback) {
    //see http://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/fql/object_url/
    FB.api(
          {
            method: 'fql.query',
            query: "SELECT id FROM object_url WHERE url = '" + url + "'"
          },
          function(response) {
            callback(response[0].id);
          }
        );
}

facebookGetIdForUrl("http://facebook.com",
     function (id) {

        alert("Facebook ID = " + id);

    });

 

I just signed up for an Amazon Android App Store developer account, because it’s free for the first year! (and $99 for each year after that! Yikes!)

Some things in the agreement are pretty sketchy though (Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer! These are my layman’s interpretations):

  1. DRM; Usage Policy. You will apply to the Apps the digital rights management technology we make available, and will not incorporate any other digital rights management technologies into the Apps.” I wonder if this means you won’t be able to use Google’s in-app billing? I don’t want to have to write several versions of the software to use different billing mechanisms!
  2. Delivery Commitment for Apps. You will deliver electronically to us (and continue to make available during the Term all versions of all software applications, games or other digital products (including any special or collector’s editions)… that you or your affiliates make available directly or indirectly to any Similar Service“. As in, you have to submit your apps to both Google’s App Market and Amazon’s App store, and keep them up to date on both. You’re not allowed to make an app available on the Google Market only. It seems that this encompasses all the apps you sell; does that mean Amazon is requiring you to give them all future apps you make? (Note it doesn’t go the other way around – you can release apps on the Amazon store and nowhere else. U mad, Google?)
  3. You also have to release it to Amazon 14 days before you put it on any Similar Service, like the Google Market. Does this apply to just putting it on your website as well?
  4. Amazon reserves the right to charge less for your app than what you are asking. If they do, you may only get 20% of the price you set. So basically, the Wolfram Alpha app that is available for free today (normally $1.99), is only paying poor Wolfram 40 cents, instead of the $1.40 he wanted. Bummer!

But yeah, since it’s free for now I am deciding to try it out. I just submitted my Pocket Looper VJ app! We’ll see if it gets accepted…